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  • Musician Spotlight: Nassib Ahmadieh
    Nassib Ahmadieh

Musician Spotlight: Nassib Ahmadieh

Cellist Nassib Ahmadieh was born in Lebanon in 1977. He joined the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra in 2000 and currently resides in Germany.

When I’m not performing with the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra…

Being a musician is the best thing that I achieved. I try to be a musician in all ways I can. Thus, I perform as a soloist (duo recitals), chamber musician (my own group), orchestra musician, and recently, teaching cello and chamber music.

Most rewarding performance with the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra and why…

Every performance with the WEDO is rewarding beyond description. The quality of music making is outstanding and the human connection inside the orchestra is always inspiring. But to name one specific performance I would say the concert in Ramallah 2005. There the orchestra was able to present like always its musical qualities, but more importantly, its humanistic side and political views.

Most important traits to have as a musician…

Curiosity, consistency, openness and modesty

Most significant musical experience: performing, listening, or otherwise…

Performing: cello-piano recital in Beiteddin Festival in Lebanon, plus most of the concerts with the WEDO

One or two works of art–music, theatre, anything–that you adore and why…

I adore the music of J.S. Bach, specifically the instrumental works. They represent for me the the intimacy that a musician should have with his instrument at anytime: playing alone at home or performing on stage. I also adore the music of Brahms. For me his music is the perfect match between beauty, harmony, form, depth, sonority and rhythm.

How did you become a musician?

I had an unbeatable passion for music as long as I can remember, but due to civil war in Lebanon, I wasn’t able to learn an instrument until I was 18! Which put me into a position where I had to decide immediately on the seriousness with which I could approach music. For me it was always obvious that I wanted to become a musician, but it was rather difficult to achieve this goal.

Is there an interesting story behind your instrument?

The instrument I play is from an unknown German maker of the late 19th century. But it was “love at first sight” or rather “first play.” And I’m particularly proud to own it.

A project on the horizon you’re excited about…

A concert trip with my Piano quartet to Malaysia and Lebanon, my home country, for the first time

I have never understood why…

…. People can be racists or have racist views or pre-judgments. Hate is also something that surprises me, but hate to the extent of wanting to kill somebody is something that I will never understand. Also, I never understood why people tend to do the worst deeds in the name of the finest thoughts: war in the name of religion! Suppressing or punishing others because they are less tolerant! Killing on the search for freedom! Fanaticism in the name of love!

When I want to get away from it all…

…Escape to nature, wandering, camping, biking. But I must confess, music is an inseparable part of my life

People are surprised to find out that…

…Started learning cello at the age of 18

I’d really love to have met…

…Pablo Casals

A question you wish someone would ask you…

Joke: “Do you want to have my Stradivari cello for free?!” 🙂

Serious: “When will the war end in the middle east?”

And the answer to that question…

Joke: Yes with pleasure!

Serious: As soon as the people forget religion, holy places and rituals and learn to appreciate the beauty of diversities and differences. No land, ideology, faith, thought, culture, heritage, or tradition is worth killing others for.

Read oboist Meirav Kadichevski’s Musician Spotlight ›››